Varieties of Preaching
Christmas Evans (1766-1838)
 
"I perceive four strong men on their journey toward Lazarus' grave, for the purpose of raising him to life. One of them, who is eminent for his piety, says, "I will descend into the grave, and will take with me a bowl of the salt of duties, and will rub him well with the sponge of natural ability." He enters the grave, and commences his rubbing process. I watch his operations at a distance, and after a while inquire, "Well, are there any symptoms of life there? Does he arise, does he breathe, my brother?" "No such thing," replies he, "He is still quiet, and I cannot salt him to will — and besides this, his smell is rather heavy." 

   Well," says the second, "Come you out; I was afraid that your means would not answer the purpose; let me enter the grave." The second enters, carrying in his hand a whip of the scorpions of threatening; and, says he, "I will make him feel." He directs his scorpion and fiery ministry at the dead corpse; but in vain, and I hear him crying out, "All is unsuccessful; dead he is after all."

   Says the third, "Make room for me to enter, and I will see if I cannot bring him to life." He enters the grave, and takes with him a musical pipe; it is melodious as the song of love; but there is no dancing in the grave.

   The fourth says, "Means of themselves can effect nothing, but I will go to Jesus, Who is the resurrection and the life." Immediately he leaves to seek for Christ, and speedily returns, accompanied by the Savior. And when the Lord came, He stands in the door of the sepulcher, and cries out, "Lazarus, come forth!" And the dead body is instantaneously instinct with life.

   Let our confidence be in the voice of the Son of God. And let us turn our faces toward the wind, and say, "O breath, come from the four winds, and breathe upon these slain, that they may live!"


Return To Poems / Tidbits

Return To CMBC Home